BIMCO Supports Push to Step Up Fight against Maritime Corruption

At the 42nd session of the International Maritime Organisation’s Facilitation Committee (FAL) in London on June 5-8th, BIMCO has backed a request made by The Maritime Anti-Corruption Network (MACN) for the IMO and member States to fully recognise the scale of maritime corruption and to take a stand against this type of crime.

Supporting this work, BIMCO has advised the IMO about the BIMCO Anti-Corruption Clause for Charter Parties. The clause addresses corruption by providing industry players with a way to respond to unlawful demands for gifts or cash.

“BIMCO supports the push against maritime corruption and can help the industry by offering tool that industry players can use in the fight against unlawful demands and corruption,” says BIMCO Head of Maritime Technology and Regulation, Aron Frank Sorensen.

The BIMCO Anti-Corruption Clause is designed for use in both voyage and time charters and sets out a series of steps that contracting parties can follow in co-operation to resist unlawful demands.

Should these steps fail, a number of options are available through the clause, with termination by either party being the ultimate sanction. The termination option has a high threshold in order to avoid misuse such as an easy way out from an inconvenient charter.

Recognising the challenges that the industry is facing from corruption, the IMO Committee, member states and organisations have decided to strengthen the work against corruption and propose ways to do so, ahead of the next IMO Facilitation Committee meeting.

Source: BIMCO

MACN Nigeria Collective Action Impact Report

MACN is just published an impact report on our work in Nigeria. It describes the work we have done together with our partners including training of 1000 local stakeholders in ethics and integrity, supporting the approval and implementation of the harmonized port procedures and the launching of a grievance mechanism where companies can complaint when they have been faced with corruption.

MACN Receives High Commendation at Seatrade Awards

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The Maritime Anti-Corruption Network (MACN) is delighted to have been awarded the High Commendation for Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) at the Seatrade Awards 2018. 

The Seatrade awards, which have been running for 30 years, recognize excellence and innovation across the maritime industry. 

MACN's Program Director, Cecilia Muller Torbrand, and MACN Chair John Sypnowich, were in London to receive the award. 

The award follows a year of significant success for MACN in 2017. 

Through its Collective Actions, MACN has inspired and delivered increased participation in the Suez Canal Say No campaign; developed a new regulatory framework for the dry-bulk vessel clearance process in Argentina, trained over 400 stakeholders, and open-sourced guidance to support implementation; enhanced container tracking in Indonesia; and delivered ethics training for close to 600 government officials in Nigeria.

Our anonymous incident reporting has continued to grow substantially. With over 19,000 incidents of corrupt practices reported to date, MACN has a strong platform to better understand the challenges and to engage with stakeholders, including governments, on shared solutions. MACN has also collaborated with other shipping organizations to address the issue of maritime corruption more broadly in the industry and with maritime regulators.

Last but not least, we now have nearly 100 companies in our network. Our collective voice and influence grows with our membership.

MACN Presents at International Maritime Organization (IMO)

The Maritime Anti-Corruption Network (MACN) was pleased to present its work to the Facilitation Committee (FAL) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO). 

The presentation covered the impact of corruption, how it acts as a trade barrier and hinders social economic growth, and its effect the well-being the seafarers. However, MACN is also able to demonstrate significant progress in tackling corruption, including in places where this had previously been thought impossible. 

MACN was pleased to have this opportunity to present the issues and raise awareness of corruption at the IMO level. We received good input and encouragement from many member states and other organizations. 

We look forward to continuing this dialogue and to working with the IMO to tackle corruption in the maritime industry.